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  • Writer's pictureVolume 82 Magazine

Women Who Dared: Women In History at a Glance

March is Women’s History Month, and before we close out the month, we’re highlighting the accomplishments of several incredible women who will be unforgettable in history!


Allyson Felix

Allyson is one of the most decorated athletes in track & field worldwide. At 18, she won the silver medal in the 200-meter sprint at the Olympics. In her third Olympic games, Allyson took gold in the event. After dominating the sport for years, she ended her career with 11 Olympic medals: seven gold, three silver, and one bronze. After ending her partnership with Nike, Allyson formed Saysh, a sneaker and lifestyle brand. (Photo Credit: @allysonfelix/Instagram)



Misty Copeland

Misty started ballet late in life, at 13, and still excelled in the craft. She’s the first Black principal ballerina for the American Ballet Theatre despite her late start and having lived in poverty as a child. Misty is also an author, was named one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people, performed on Broadway, and has endorsed several brands. (Photo Credit: Mistycopeland.com)


Condoleezza Rice

Condoleezza was the first Black female U.S. Secretary of State and the nation’s first female National Security Advisor. She was also a provost and professor at Stanford University.

(Photo Credit: @condoleezzarice/Instagram)


Judge Shannon Frison

Judge Frison’s combination of tattoos that she displays while in court doesn’t negate her intelligence or capabilities, as her professional resume is extensive! She was educated at Harvard University, Radcliffe College, and Georgetown University. Judge Frison is a former U.S. Marine and a Marine Judge Advocate. Before being appointed as a Massachusetts judge, she owned and practiced law out of her firm, Frison Law Firm, P.C. (Photo Credit:@judgefrison/Instagram)


Serena & Venus Williams

Sisters Serena and Venus Williams have ranked number 1 worldwide and won the highest honors in tennis, including the Olympics. They were molded into tennis stars at an early age by their father, Richard Williams. Neither star has confirmed their retirement from the sport yet.

(Photo Credit: Olympics.com)


Violet Palmer

Violet is the first female NBA referee. She also refereed for the WNBA. She’s a former college athlete who competed in NCAA championship games. (Photo Credit: Doug Pesinger/Getty Images)


Oprah Winfrey

Oprah is the first Black female billionaire. Her talk show, “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” was one of the most popular television shows when it aired. She’s also a philanthropist, actress, author, and film producer. Oprah currently has a television network, OWN (Oprah Winfrey Network). (Photo Credit: Shutterstock)


Diana Taurasi

Diana plays for the WNBA’s Phoenix Mercury. During her WNBA career, she’s won three championships, five Olympic gold medals, and has been on multiple WNBA all-star teams. Diana received a lot of recognition during her college career at the University of Connecticut under coach Geno Auriemma. During her four years at UConn, she led the team to three NCAA championship titles. She is ranked as one of the best female NCAA players of all time. (Photo Credit: SportingNews.com)



Michelle Obama

Michelle was the first African American first lady of the United States. She was educated at Princeton University and Harvard Law School, eventually practicing law in Chicago. Michelle is also an author. She won a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for the audio version of her book “Becoming.” Many Americans view her as the most popular first lady! (Photo Credit:@michelleobama/Instagram)


Dawn Staley

Dawn led Team USA to a gold medal in the 1996 Olympics. She also played in the ABL and is in the top 15 for WNBA players. Dawn was a star point guard at the University of Virginia during her college career. She successfully returned to NCAA sports, first as head coach for Temple University and currently as head coach for the University of South Carolina. (Photo Credit: Kirby Lee/USA Today Sports)








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